Write permission error when inserting over linked server

I spent some time troubleshoot permissions over a linked server recently before finding out the the cause of my error wasn’t permissions-related at all. I was attempting to perform an insert on a remote table, and was getting the following error:

Msg 7344, Level 16, State 1, Line 2
The OLE DB provider “SQLNCLI10” for linked server “RemoteServer” could not INSERT INTO table “[RemoteServer].[RemoteDB].[dbo].[IdentInsertTest]” because of column “ID”. The user did not have permission to write to the column.

After some time attempting to isolate the missing permissions, I realized that it was actually a disguised error message. I was trying to insert a value into an identity column, but rather than the standard error message I expected to see in that case, I got a generic “You don’t have permission” message, leading to some wasted time troubleshooting.

To recreate the issue, you can follow these steps:

-- Create a test table
CREATE TABLE IdentInsertTest (
	ID INT IDENTITY(1,1),
	SomeValue VARCHAR(10)
)

-- This insert will succeed
INSERT INTO IdentInsertTest (SomeValue)
SELECT 'Some Value'

-- Will fail with IDENTITY_INSERT error
INSERT INTO IdentInsertTest (ID, SomeValue)
SELECT 10, 'Some Value'

The second statement will fail with the standard error message:

Cannot insert explicit value for identity column in table ‘IdentInsertTest’ when IDENTITY_INSERT is set to OFF.

Now, connect to another server and set up a linked server to the other instance, and then try these statements again:

-- This remote insert will succeed
INSERT INTO LinkedServer.RemoteDB.dbo.IdentInsertTest (SomeValue)
SELECT 'Some Value'

-- Will fail with a permissions error
INSERT INTO LinkedServer.RemoteDB.dbo.IdentInsertTest (ID, SomeValue)
SELECT 10, 'Some Value'

If I’d realized what I was doing, it would have saved me some troubleshooting time! The moral here is that if your statement fails over a linked server, ensure your user account is set up correctly and then test it locally – you may get a more accurate error message!

Identifying row in SQL view (or table) with a calculation error

Computed columns can be a great tool if you want to add a value to a table that’s dependent on other columns in the table, and you don’t want to maintain it on its own every time the source columns change. In a view, these can provide a single, consistent calculation to the end users – say, for a

-- Set up a view with the same columns and calculation errors in it
-- The first calculation will always work
-- The second gives a divide by zero error on every 10th row
CREATE VIEW SourceObject AS
SELECT object_id AS KeyColumn1,
       column_id as KeyColumn2,
       object_id - column_id as CalcColumn1,
       (object_id - (column_id % 10)) as CalcColumn2
  FROM msdb.sys.columns

Now that it’s set up, we can try selecting all the rows from the view we just created, and we’ll see about 100 rows output, and then the query will stop with a “Divide by zero” error:

SELECT * FROM SourceObject

The calculation in this query is pretty straightforward, and you can see which rows are causing a problem (where column_id is divisible by 10), but what if it was more complicated? The problem is that SQL doesn’t display the row that had a problem – it stops on the row before the problem, so finding the row with the error is bit more difficult. If there were multiple columns involved in the calculation, or different combinations of values that could result in an error? Tracking down the rows causing an error can be difficult – you have to find all the possible conditions that could cause an error, and then query for each of them.

This script will allow you to find all the rows in a view with a calculation error, all at once. It uses a cursor to pull the rows from the view one at a time, test the calculation, and then write any errors it finds to a table where you can see the rows that are causing problems. Using a CURSOR generally isn’t ideal, but in this case, it’s the only way to react to a bad calculation on a row-by-row basis and deal with it.

The script can use two key values from your view – they’re called KeyColumn1 and KeyColumn2 – and you can modify the script to name them whatever you want, or just a single a value if that makes more sense in your scenario. It also supports two computed columns – CalcColumn1 and 2 – though again, it could be changed to just check a single column.

 -- Set up variables
DECLARE @KeyColumn1 INT,
		@KeyColumn2 INT,
		@CalcColumn1 INT,
		@CalcColumn2 INT
		
DECLARE @CurrentRow BIGINT
	SET @CurrentRow = 1

-- Set up a place to hold key values for rows that work  
  SELECT TOP 0 KeyColumn1, KeyColumn2
    INTO #WorkingRows
    FROM SourceObject

-- Set up a place to hold errors for rows that don't work    
CREATE TABLE #ErrorRows (
	RowNumber BIGINT,
	KeyColumn1 INT,
	KeyColumn2 INT,
	[ERROR_NUMBER] INT,
	[ERROR_MESSAGE] nvarchar(4000)
)    

-- Begin loop to look through rows in the view 
  DECLARE cur INSENSITIVE CURSOR FOR
  SELECT KeyColumn1, KeyColumn2
  FROM SourceObject
  ORDER BY KeyColumn1, KeyColumn2
  
  OPEN cur
  
  FETCH NEXT FROM cur
  INTO @KeyColumn1, @KeyColumn2
	
  WHILE @@FETCH_STATUS = 0
  BEGIN
  
	BEGIN TRY

		-- Try to select the calculated columns	
		-- If there's an error, it will jump to the CATCH block
		SELECT @CalcColumn1 = CalcColumn1,
				@CalcColumn2 = CalcColumn2
		  FROM SourceObject
		 WHERE KeyColumn1 = @KeyColumn1
		   AND KeyColumn2 = @KeyColumn2
		   
		-- This lookup succeeded
		INSERT INTO #WorkingRows
		SELECT @KeyColumn1, @KeyColumn2
		
	END TRY
	BEGIN CATCH
		
		-- The lookup failed - save details
		INSERT INTO #ErrorRows
		SELECT @CurrentRow,
				@KeyColumn1,
				@KeyColumn2,
				ERROR_NUMBER(),
				ERROR_MESSAGE()			
		
	END CATCH
	
	SET @CurrentRow = @CurrentRow + 1
	    
	FETCH NEXT FROM cur
	INTO @KeyColumn1, @KeyColumn2
	    
  END
  
  -- Show the key columns of rows with errors
  SELECT * FROM #ErrorRows
  
  -- Show the key columns of working rows
  SELECT * FROM #WorkingRows
  
  -- Clean things up
  close cur
  deallocate cur
  drop table #ErrorRows
  drop table #workingrows

At the end, you’ll have two tables with results in them – #ErrorRows, which contains the key values for rows with errors in them, as well as details about the error message, and #WorkingRows, which contains the key values for all of the working rows from the view.

Note: I could just as easily set up a table with a computed column in it that causes the same problem You’d be unable to select the entire table without an error, and hunting down the row with an error is painful. The script to find the error is the same, but here’s an example of a table that has a computed column with this problem:

-- Set up table with a list of numbers in it
SELECT object_id AS KeyColumn1,
		RANK() OVER (PARTITION BY 0
					 ORDER BY NEWID()) as KeyColumn2
  INTO SourceObject
  FROM msdb.sys.columns
  
-- Add two calculations to the table
-- The first will always work
-- The second will give a "Divide by zero" every 100 rows
  ALTER TABLE SourceObject ADD CalcColumn1 as (KeyColumn1 - KeyColumn2)
  ALTER TABLE SourceObject ADD CalcColumn2 as (KeyColumn1 / (KeyColumn2 % 100))

-- Note that you can't add a persisted computed column to a table
-- if there's a calculation error in any of the rows, so this
-- command will fail with a "Divide by zero" error
  ALTER TABLE SourceObject ADD CalcColumn3 as (KeyColumn1 / (KeyColumn2 % 100)) PERSISTED

Identifying SQL Server 2005 Enterprise Edition features in use

I recently stumbled across a great system view, sys.dm_db_persisted_sku_features, which identifies any enterprise features in use in the current database, which would prevent you from moving this database to a Standard Edition instance. Unfortunately, it appears in SQL 2008, and I wanted to run this check on a SQL 2005 system.

There are a number of server-level features of SQL 2005 that require Enterprise Edition, but only two database-level features – partitioning and the VarDecimal storage format. Both are easy to check for, so I put together this quick query to do it:

select * from
   (-- VarDecimal Storage Format
    select case
             when max(objectproperty(object_id, N'TableHasVarDecimalStorageFormat')) = 0
               then ''
             else 'VarDecimal Storage'
           end as feature_name
      from sys.objects
    UNION ALL
    -- Partitioning
    select case
             when max(partition_number) > 1
               then 'Partitioning'
             else ''
           end
      from sys.partitions
) t
where feature_name <> ''

On a SQL 2005 server, this query will serve the same purpose that sys.dm_db_persisted_sku_features does on SQL 2008/2012 servers.

Unexpected results from ISNULL in SQL Compact 3.5

In SQL Server, the ISNULL function takes two arguments – the first is a potentially NULL value, and the second is another potentially NULL value. If the first value is NULL, the function returns the second value instead. It’s always been this way – for example:

  SELECT V1, V2,
         ISNULL(V1, V2) as [Result],
         Descr
  FROM (SELECT 10 as V1, 20 as V2, 'Returns first' as Descr UNION
        SELECT 10 as V1, NULL as V2, 'Returns first' as Descr UNION
        SELECT NULL as V1, 20 as V2, 'Returns second' as Descr UNION
        SELECT NULL as V1, NULL as V2, 'Both NULL - return NULL' as Descr) t

In SQL Server, you get the following results:

V1      V2      Result  Descr
10      20      10      Returns first
10      NULL    10      Returns first
NULL    20      20      Returns second
NULL    NULL    NULL    Both NULL - return NULL

However, SQL Compact implements ISNULL differently, in a way that’s not compatible at all – instead, the ISNULL function returns a 0 or 1 based on whether the first parameter is NULL! It doesn’t even process the second parameter, but instead of failing with an “Invalid Syntax” error, it happily accepts it, executes, and returns unexpected results. In SQL Compact, you get the following result set:

V1      V2      Result  Descr
10      20      0       Returns first
10      NULL    0       Returns first
NULL    20      1       Returns second
NULL    NULL    1       Both NULL - return NULL

Notice the difference? The ISNULL column is returning the value based only on the first parameter (a “0” if it’s not NULL, and a “1” if it is), and if you’re not expecting it, it silently mis-calculates any formulas containing that function. If you’re relying on the function in any statements that add values together or make decisions based on the results, you’re in for some very expected behavior (in my case, I noticed totals that were wildly incorrect).

As an alternative, you should be using the COALESCE – it accepts multiple parameters and it walks down the list until it finds one that’s not null, returning a NULL value if all parameters are NULL. This function can be used in place of ISNULL in SQL Server code with exactly the same behavior (i.e. no changes), and as a bonus, it acts the same in SQL Compact, so your formulas will work properly there as well. The example above becomes:

  SELECT V1, V2,
         COALESCE(V1, V2) as [Result],
         Descr
  FROM (SELECT 10 as V1, 20 as V2, 'Returns first' as Descr UNION
        SELECT 10 as V1, NULL as V2, 'Returns first' as Descr UNION
        SELECT NULL as V1, 20 as V2, 'Returns second' as Descr UNION
        SELECT NULL as V1, NULL as V2, 'Both NULL - return NULL' as Descr) t

And on both SQL Server and SQL Compact, the result set is the same:

V1      V2      Result  Descr
10      20      10      Returns first
10      NULL    10      Returns first
NULL    20      20      Returns second
NULL    NULL    NULL    Both NULL - return NULL

+1 for consistency!

MORAL of the story:

When executing statements on different platforms, ensure the functions you use behave in the same manner on both – and even when considering multiple platforms from the same vendor, named almost identically, don’t assume things behave unless you’ve tested them 🙂

“Initializing Reconciler has failed” when setting up SQL Compact replication

When initializing replication to a .NET Compact Framework client on a mobile device, I was receiving an error message when I attempted to start the synchronize:

Initializing the SQL Server Reconciler has failed. Try again.

I had confirmed that SQL Compact web replication was set up correctly, and checking the URL came back as expected. Searching for the error online comes back with a dozen recommendations, but when I traced the replication sync attempt, I saw the following statement executed:

exec sp_helpdistpublisher N’SQLSERVERNAME’

Followed immediately by the error message:

The remote server “SQLSERVERNAME” does not exist, or has not been designated as a valid Publisher, or you may not have permission to see available Publishers.

Sure enough, executing that command in SSMS, logged in as my replication user, gave me the same error message. At some point, I’d changed the user I was using to set up the subscription, and that user didn’t have rights to view the publication list on my SQL Server. The fix was pretty easy:

  1. In SQL Management Studio, right-click the publication
  2. Select “Properties” and then open the “Publication Access List” tab
  3. Add the user you’re connecting your subscriber with to this list

Here’s a shot of the screen where I had to make this change, in case there’s any confusion:

Publication Security Settings

Refreshing changed .NET SQL CLR assemblies after patching/updates

After applying some Windows updates to one of my servers, I started getting the following error when I ran a customer .NET SQL-CLR stored proc:

Server: Msg 6522, Level 16, State 2, Line 1
A .NET Framework error occurred during execution of user defined routine or aggregate ‘somemethodyourecalling’:

System.IO.FileLoadException: Could not load file or assembly ‘System.Drawing, Version=2.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=b03f5f7f11d50a3a’ or one of its dependencies. Assembly in host store has a different signature than assembly in GAC. (Exception from HRESULT: 0x80131050)

I’d imported some additional assemblies into SQL Server for use in SQL CLR mapped stored procedures, and the Windows updates had included a service pack for .NET, which changed some of the assemblies. Now the version I’d linked to SQL Server no longer existed on disk, and SQL couldn’t load it – that made sense, and is documented pretty clearly in this MS Support article: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/949080

However, I had dozens of servers with SQL CLR components enabled, and hundreds of different assemblies loaded across them all, and not always the same in each server, so a standard update script wouldn’t work to refresh all the changed assemblies (the MS Support link provides a list of the standard ones that cause that error, but if you’ve got custom assemblies loaded, or you’ve loaded an assembly that’s not specifically cleared for SQL CLR, then it’s not on the list either). To deal with this, I wrote a script that fetches the assembly list for a database and attempts to refresh every one of them from their disk location. If they haven’t changed, the update attempt will fail with a specific error message about the MVID, and there’s no change for that assembly.

Also, I’ve commented out the line that restricts it to just framework assemblies (System.* and Microsoft.*), but you can uncomment that line if you’d like to restrict the refresh from attempting to reload your custom assemblies as well.

DECLARE @AssemblyName VARCHAR(255),
	    @AssemblyLocation VARCHAR(255),
	    @AlterAssemblyCommand NVARCHAR(1024),
	    @DotNetFolder VARCHAR(100)

   SET @DotNetFolder = 'C:\Windows\Microsoft.NET\Framework\v2.0.50727'

CREATE TABLE #Results (
		AssemblyName VARCHAR(255),
		AssemblyLocation VARCHAR(255),
		AlterAssemblyCommand NVARCHAR(1024),
		Results VARCHAR(1024)
)

select sa.name as AssemblyName,
		saf.name as Assemblylocation,
		case when charindex('', saf.name) = 0
			then 'ALTER ASSEMBLY [' + sa.name + '] FROM ''' + @DotNetFolder
			else 'ALTER ASSEMBLY [' + sa.name + '] FROM '''
		end + saf.name + (case right(saf.name, 4) when '.dll' then '' else '.dll' end) + ''''
		as AlterAssemblyCommand
INTO #Refresh
from sys.assemblies sa
join sys.assembly_files saf
  on sa.assembly_id = saf.assembly_id
where sa.name <> ('Microsoft.SqlServer.Types')
  --and (sa.name like 'System.%' or sa.name like 'microsoft.%')

DECLARE Commands CURSOR FAST_FORWARD FOR
SELECT AssemblyName,
	   AssemblyLocation,
	   AlterAssemblyCommand
  FROM #Refresh

OPEN Commands

FETCH NEXT FROM Commands
INTO @AssemblyName,
	   @AssemblyLocation,
	   @AlterAssemblyCommand

WHILE @@FETCH_STATUS = 0
BEGIN

	BEGIN TRY
		exec sp_executesql @AlterAssemblyCommand

		insert into #Results
		SELECT @AssemblyName,
				@AssemblyLocation,
				@AlterAssemblyCommand,
				'Assembly refreshed successfully'

	END TRY
	BEGIN CATCH

		insert into #Results
		SELECT @AssemblyName,
				@AssemblyLocation,
				@AlterAssemblyCommand,
				CASE ERROR_NUMBER()
					WHEN 6285 THEN 'No update necessary (MVID match)'
					WHEN 6501 THEN 'Physical assembly not found at specified location (SQL Error 6501)'
					ELSE ERROR_MESSAGE() + ' (SQL Error ' + convert(varchar(10), ERROR_NUMBER()) + ')'
				END

	END CATCH

	FETCH NEXT FROM Commands
	INTO @AssemblyName,
		   @AssemblyLocation,
		   @AlterAssemblyCommand

END

CLOSE Commands
DEALLOCATE Commands

SELECT * FROM #Results

drop table #refresh
drop table #Results

While troubleshooting the error, I came across this as well – I don’t have a SQL 2012 server handy to check with, it looks like this problem might be resolved with a reboot in SQL 2012:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/hh479773.aspx

I’m not sure if that’s the case, but it would make things easier. Also, it would be nice if there was some kind of “ALTER ASSEMBLY [SomeAssembly] REFRESH” command to address this problem, but maybe in a future version.

Additionally, this error can be caused if the signing of an assembly has changed, but not necessarily the signature, but just reloading it from disk won’t work because the method that SQL Server uses to determine if there’s been a change is the MVID, and that doesn’t change unless there’s been a code change of some kind (see the Connect bug here). In those cases, you’ll actually need to drop and recreate the assembly, including any supporting objects that rely on that assembly.

Matching up SQL CE DLL version numbers

The Abstract:

While developing a Windows Mobile device application on two different computers, I thought I’d installed SQL Server Compact Edition 3.5 SP2 on both of them, but ran into some version difference issues. In researching it, I couldn’t find good information about the different versions of the System.Data.SqlCompactCe DLL, so thought some future developers might enjoy what I found out, all in one place.

The Problem:

After checking the project into source control on one computer and fetching it on the other, I’d see a broken reference to System.Data.SqlServerCe:

Missing reference to System.Data.SqlServerCe
Missing reference to System.Data.SqlServerCe

And I received the following message (and about 100 errors – one for every reference to the namespace in my code) when I attempted to compile:

Warning 10
Could not resolve this reference. Could not locate the assembly “System.Data.SqlServerCe, Version=3.5.1.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=3be235df1c8d2ad3, processorArchitecture=MSIL”. Check to make sure the assembly exists on disk. If this reference is required by your code, you may get compilation errors.

If I dropped the reference, re-added it on my second computer (BTW – only one version was listed in my .NET reference list on both machines) and checked it back in, then I’d get the same situation on my first computer with the following error message:

Warning 10
Could not resolve this reference. Could not locate the assembly “System.Data.SqlServerCe, Version=3.5.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=3be235df1c8d2ad3, processorArchitecture=MSIL”. Check to make sure the assembly exists on disk. If this reference is required by your code, you may get compilation errors.

The Research:

I had a DLL version mismatch – a general problem when you’ve got multiple computers you’re developing something on, since you have to ensure the same versions and packages are installed on each. However, searching for details on the different versions of this DLL in the wild wasn’t fruitful – did I have SQL Compact 3.5 RTM installed (3.5.0.0)? If I’d installed v3.5 SP2, why was it shown as 3.5.1.0 (shouldn’t it be 3.5.2.0?) on one machine, but as 3.5.0.0 the other? To top that off, both versions (v3.5.0.0 and v3.5.1.0) were in my GAC as MSIL – what?

It turns out that when you add a reference to this DLL in a Compact Framework project, Visual Studio is using the following version (depending on whether you’re on an x86 or x64 machine):

x86: C:\Program Files\Microsoft SQL Server Compact Edition\v3.5\Devices\System.Data.SqlServerCe.dll
x64: C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft SQL Server Compact Edition\v3.5\Devices\System.Data.SqlServerCe.dll

There, I found my issue – that file version was a different version on each machine (3.5.5692.0 on one and 3.5.8080.0 on the other). To find out why, I had to dig into the registry, where I found all kinds of version information about the SQL Server Compact Edition components I’d installed, the DLL version, and the service pack levels:

x86 or x64 components
HKLM\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Microsoft SQL Server Compact Edition\v3.5\ENU

or if you want to see x86 components installed on your x64 machine:
HKLM\SOFTWARE\Wow6432Node\Microsoft\Microsoft SQL Server Compact Edition\v3.5\ENU

There, you’ll find a combination of “Version” and “ServicePackLevel” entries for every SQL CE component you have installed, and it will shed some light. Here are the version numbers I found (for the various components):

SQL Compact 3.5 RTM
ServicePackLevel: 0
Version: 3.5.5386.0

SQL Compact 3.5 SP1
ServicePackLevel: 1
Version: 3.5.5692.0

SQL Compact 3.5 SP2
ServicePackLevel: 2
Version: 3.5.8080.0

So how did I end up with the SP1 version installed on one machine, but not on the other? Since I’d installed SQL Compact SP2 on both machines, I was baffled. As it turns out, Visual Studio 2008 RTM deploys SQL Compact 3.5 RTM (3.5.5386.0), and applying Visual Studio 2008 SP1 patches that to the SP1 version (3.5.5692.0) – notice the VSToolsVersion/VSToolsServicePackLevel values in the registry location above, which reflect your current service pack level of Visual Studio 2008.

The Solution:

While I’d installed VS 2008 SP1 on both machines, I’d installed the actual SQL Compact 3.5 SP2 for Windows Mobile (EDIT 2016-10-31: This link has been updated to the current location for this download) package on only one machine and not the other – this left the DLL on one machine patched to SP1 (courtesy of Visual Studio) and the other machine with a fully-patched SP2 DLL (courtesy of the actual SP2 Windows Mobile installer).

I confirmed this by running the SP2 for Windows Mobile installer, and it patched my DLL right up to the full SP2 version – problem resolved, and the project now opens up on both workstations with no need for any DLL reference swapping.

The Moral:

Honestly, a bit embarrassing and a pretty amateur move where some vigilance could have saved me quite a bit of aggrivation.

ENSURE YOU’RE DEPLOYING ALL THE SAME PACKAGES ON ALL DEVELOPMENT MACHINES! JUST BECAUSE SOMETHING ALREADY EXISTS ON ONE MACHINE, DON’T ASSUME IT’S THE SAME VERSION!

Calculating working hours between two dates

As a follow-up to an earlier post (Return a list of all dates between a start and end date), I need to find the number of working hours between two timestamps – in this case, it was to see how long a support ticket had been open before it was initially assigned, but the user didn’t want non-work hours to count against them.

To do this, I used the previous script to generate a list of dates and hours, and then marked the rows as work time or not (based on day of week and hour of day, evaluated together). The result was a table that would effectively let me do a SUM to find the value I was looking for. Once I had that table, I could join to it for rows between the two datetimes in question and SUM up rows that had “WorkTime” marked:

SELECT tt.TicketNumber,
       tt.TicketCreateTime,
       tt.TicketAssignTime,
       SUM(  CONVERT(INT, wh.WorkTime)) as WorkHoursBeforeAssigned
       COUNT(CONVERT(INT, wh.WorkTime)) as TotalHoursBeforeAssigned
  FROM TroubleTickets tt
  JOIN #WorkingHours wh
    ON wh.EvaluateTime BETWEEN tt.TicketCreateTime
                           AND tt.TicketAssignTime
GROUP BY tt.TicketNumber,
         tt.TicketCreateTime,
         tt.TicketAssignTime

In this case, tickets that were created and picked up after hours, without passing any worktime, would show as zero hours old (as they should, since they were interested in working time) – however, I’ve also included COUNT here to show total hours as well as work hours.

Also, this script only counts for raw day-of-week and hour-of-day working time – it ignores holidays and other special circumstances. I have a script that tracks holidays (American ones, at least), and I’ll put that up shortly as well – if you want to take holidays into account, you could incorporate that into your evaluation.

Here’s the script that builds the working time table (you can also download it here):

-- Set things up before we get started
--------------------------------------
DECLARE @WorkTimeStart		TINYINT,
		@WorkTimeEnd		TINYINT,
		@WorkDayOfWeekStart	TINYINT,
		@WorkDayOfWeekEnd	TINYINT

DECLARE @StartDate			DATETIME,
		@EndDate			DATETIME

CREATE TABLE #WorkingHours (
		EvaluateTime	DATETIME,
		IsWorktime		BIT DEFAULT(0)
)

--------------------------------------

	SET @WorkTimeStart = 7  --7AM
	SET @WorkTimeEnd   = 16 --4PM hour (4-5PM count as working)
	SET @WorkDayOfWeekStart = 2 --Monday
	SET @WorkDayOfWeekEnd   = 6 --Friday

	SET @StartDate	= '2000-01-01 00:00:00'
	SET @EndDate	= '2020-12-31 23:59:59'

--------------------------------------


-- Built the list of timestamps we're working with
;WITH numberlist(number)
   AS (SELECT RANK() over(order by c1.object_id,
                                   c1.column_id,
                                   c2.object_id,
                                   c2.column_id)
		 from sys.columns c1
        cross 
         join sys.columns c2)
INSERT INTO #WorkingHours (EvaluateTime)
SELECT DATEADD(hh, number-1, @StartDate)
  FROM numberlist
 WHERE DATEADD(hh, number-1, @StartDate) <= @EndDate


-- Set the times to worktime if they match criteria
UPDATE #WorkingHours
   SET IsWorktime = CASE WHEN (DATEPART(dw, EvaluateTime)
								BETWEEN @WorkDayOfWeekStart
								AND @WorkDayOfWeekEnd)
							  AND
							  (DATEPART(hh, EvaluateTime)
							   BETWEEN @WorkTimeStart
							   AND @WorkTimeEnd) THEN 1
						 ELSE 0
					END


-- Retun the results
 SELECT * FROM #WorkingHours
 ORDER BY EvaluateTime

 DROP TABLE #WorkingHours

“Invalid server” error while altering SQL Agent Job step

When updating a SQL Agent job step to run an SSIS package instead of executing an SSAS script, I received the following error when trying to save the Agent Job:

The specified ‘@server’ is invalid (valid values are returned by sp_helpserver).
The specified '@server' is invalid (valid values are returned by sp_helpserver)

I initially thought this error had something to do with my package connections, but it didn’t – it occurred because I had changed the job step from an SSAS script to an SSIS package, rather than creating a new step and removing the old one. This actually seemed to occur when I alter the “SQL Server Analysis Services Command” step to any other type of step – it must leave some portion of the step partially configured, and it throws a validation error when you try to save it.

Solution:

To work around this error, delete the old “SSAS Command” step, rather than modifying it, and created a new step to run your SSIS package. It will validate without error and let you save the updated package.

Receiving (or stopping!) SQL Server maintenance plan summary emails

When you use the Maintenance Plan wizard in SQL Management Studio to set up a new plan, you have the option to have the SQL Agent send you a plan execution summary email:

It’s a pretty handy email – not just a success/failure on the SQL Agent job, but details about the actual maintenance plan steps and which ones ran and for how long. The problem we ran into was how to actually turn this email off once it was initially enabled in the wizard! It’s not anywhere in the SQL Agent job or in the properties of the maintenance plan, or even anywhere obvious in the maintenance plan designer. It’s hidden in a tiny button on the toolbar in the designer called “Reporting and Logging”:

Clicking there gets you some logging options, including sending a summary email to an operator:

From there, you can change the operator or stop the email summary (or start it, if that’s what you’re looking for).