Import first sheet of an Excel workbook into Power Query, regardless of its name

I recently had to import a large number of Excel workbooks into Power Query (using “From Folder” – if you haven’t used this feature, it’s a huge time-saver when you’ve got a ton of matching files to import). The problem was that each workbook had a different name for the first tab and the import process gets data from tabs with the same name (assuming all your files match).

By default when you create a workbook, Excel names the first sheet “Sheet1”, but if the files you’re importing have sheets with different names, you can tell Power Query to load the first sheet of each file, regardless of the name – here’s the process (skip to step 5 to see the specific M-query solution):

  1. Select “Get Data” -> “From File” -> “From Folder” – this lets you import all the files from a folder at once (assuming their format matches).
  2. Select the folder where your files are stored (I have three files in the folder in this example).
  3. Select an example file and which sheet you’d like to import – this is what you’ll use to create your transformations (before the files are merged together) – in this example, my sheet is called “Bob’s sheet” (which is specific to just that single file).
  4. When you select “Import”, you’ll receive the error “[Expression.Error] The key didn’t match any rows in the table.” – this is because the other workbooks don’t contain any sheets with that name (though the error is a bit cryptic).
    If you double-click on the “Data Files” query with the error, you can see that it loaded the data from the first file, but nothing from the others:
  5. To correct this issue and tell Power Query to just use the first tab in the workbook in every case, open the “Transform Sample File from Data Files” query and click “Advanced Editor”.
  6. You’re now looking at the M-query behind this object (if you want it, here’s a great video on M if you’ve never worked it before and want a primer – I watched a bunch of different videos and this one really connected the dots for me). The section with the sheet name is highlighted:
    Replace the highlighted text with “Item=Source{0}[Item]” so that it looks like this:
    (The “0” refers to the first sheet – if you want the second sheet, you’d use “1” and so on)
  7. Once you make change, you can see in the Power Query window that it’s now getting data from every file.
  8. Once you click “Close and Load” to get back to Excel, click on the “Refresh All” button to force a data refresh and you’ll see it import all the files, regardless of their sheet name:

That’s it – you’re pulling in all the workbooks regardless of their sheet name!

I’d never used the “From Folder” feature, but I’d definitely recommend trying it out – it was a huge time-saver for me and allowed me to import hundreds of matching Excel files into a single model in minutes!

Export from SQL Server to XLS and email results

Sometimes you want to take some query results and export them directly to an XLS file – here’s how you can set that up in SQL Server. The biggest caveat is that you need to run it from an x86 instance of SQL Server – the x64 instance won’t have access to the Jet driver needed to write the Excel file (Microsoft.Jet.OLEDB.4.0), where the x86 version will. In fact, we maintain an older x86 instance of SQL Server for random processes like this that need it – x64 is better in almost every case, but we can’t see to completely ditch x86… 🙂

I use a stored proc that I call from a SQL Agent Job, which works great. The actual process is a bit awkward – for starters, you’ll need access to xp_cmdshell. SQL Server can’t create a new Excel file from scratch, so you have to keep a blank Excel file around, make a copy of it, and then insert into the copy to get your final result.

That said, here’s the code to generate the XLS file from your query results:

SELECT Column1, Column2, Column3, Column4
  INTO ##YourTempTable
  FROM SomeOtherTable

SET @Folder = 'C:\Temp\'
SET @DocumentBlank = 'Your Document - Blank'
SET @DocumentLong = 'Your Document - ' + CONVERT(VARCHAR(10), GETDATE(), 120)

DECLARE @CMD NVARCHAR(4000)
SET @CMD = 'COPY "' + @folder + @DocumentBlank + '.xls" "' + @Folder + @DocumentLong + '.xls"'
exec master..xp_cmdshell @CMD

-- Export the Excel sheet
SET @CMD = 'insert into OPENROWSET(''Microsoft.Jet.OLEDB.4.0'',
	''Excel 8.0;Database=' + @Folder + @DocumentLong + '.xls;'',
	''SELECT * FROM [Sheet1$]'')
	select Column1, Column2, Column3, Column4 from ##YourTempTable'

exec sp_executesql @CMD

Once that’s exported, you can just set up the email process using sp_send_dbmail and attach the file you just generated:

DECLARE @Body VARCHAR(2000)

SET @Attachments = @Folder + @DocumentLong  + '.xls'
SET @Body = 'Your file has been generated for ' + CONVERT(VARCHAR(10), GETDATE(), 120)

exec msdb..sp_send_dbmail @profile_name = 'YourMailProfile',
	@Recipients = 'Recipients@YourDomain.biz',
	@subject = 'Your file is ready',
	@Body = @Body,
	@file_attachments = @DocumentLong